It's ok not to be ok-Louise Aron

Hey guys, when reflecting about what to write about for this World Mental Health Day, I was shopping online for some cool t-shirts with mental health slogans and this idea hit me.

Whilst we have advanced so much regarding mental health stigma and awareness, there is still so much for us to do. So this article is there to reinforce the idea that:

It’s okay to:

  1. Not be okay:

We live in a world that throws all sorts of challenges our way. We have highs, we have lows and that is okay. It’s okay to be going through a difficult part of your life. You’re not a failure for struggling. You’re not the only one and know it will get better. There’s so many positive ways you can help yourself to feel better. Reach out to your local university welfare team, go to your doctor. There’s light at the end of the tunnel. 

 2. Take medication:

Taking medication to improve your mental health is not a sign of weakness. In fact, it’s a sign of strength to get through the challenges you’ve been facing. I’m not saying medication is the go-to remedy to sooth your mental health. However, mental health is just as important as physical health and if that means taking medication would be beneficial to you, it would seem odd not to

 3. Go to therapy:

Along with medication, therapy has a lot of stigma. But, I want you to know that taking the decision to go to therapy and deal with the troubles in your life can be the most rewarding and gratifying thing. Although, I appreciate therapy is not for everyone, I have found it to be extremely beneficial in improving my wellbeing. Whilst we can confide in friends, family, colleagues, psychologists are trained to help you through your difficulties and help you turn out stronger on the other side.

4. Take out time for yourself

University life can be extremely busy. Running from lectures to social events, to society meetings, it’s normal to feel overwhelmed by that. Know that it’s okay to take time out for yourself. Devoting time to self-care will help you to step back and destress from it all.  

I just want to conclude this article by something my Dad told me during a difficult time: “Your health and wellbeing is always the priority.” You are the most important person in your life, so remember to look after yourself and don’t be afraid to ask for help if you’re struggling. It’s okay to not be okay.

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